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Know who to listen to

Pay close to attention to the source.

Bruno Pešec
Bruno Pešec
1 min read
Know who to listen to

I Who Have Never Known Men is bleak, haunting, and wonderful. The author paints vivid imagery and yet leaves ample white space for the reader to bask in.

Some readers love that. Some readers hate that. What does that say about the book? What does it say about the readers? And what does it say about innovation?

I'm not a literary expert, so I will refrain from artistic analysis of the book. But I can comment more on the last question.

Divisive products are not inherently bad, especially if they help us distinguish different customer segments. But if our product is dividing a seemingly unified segment, then that's a strong signal to look into what are we missing.

The most valuable feedback is from those whom we want to create value for.

Innovation

Bruno Pešec

I turn corporate innovation into a viable investment.

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